Lab Members

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Michael Patnode (he/him)

Assistant Professor

B.S. - University of Washington - Biochemistry

Ph.D. - University of California, San Francisco - Biomedical Sciences

Postdoctoral Fellowship - Washington University in St. Louis

PatnodeLab at ucsc.edu

Michael grew up in the Seattle area, and completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Washington. He moved to University of California, San Francisco for graduate training in the lab of Dr. Steven Rosen where he focused on immunology and glycobiology. He carried out post-doctoral work with Dr. Jeffrey Gordon at Washington University in St. Louis, exploring how host diet shapes gut microbial communities, before joining the faculty in the METX Department in November 2020.

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Nicolette Hernandez-Kaempf (she/her)

Specialist

B.S. - Western Washington University - Environmental Toxicology

Minor - Environmental Justice

nherna55 at ucsc.edu

My background is in Environmental Toxicology and Environmental Justice. My undergraduate research included analyzing the sedimentation rates and toxicity of silver nanoparticles in different freshwater mediums and analyzing seaweed contaminants along the Puget Sound. I work to ensure that my science is accessible to all, in hopes that I help bridge the gap between scientific understanding and the public. When I am not at the lab, you can find me at the dance studio, biking around town or reading a historical fiction novel. 

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Bo Huey (Charles) Chiang (he/him)

Ph.D. Student

B.S. - University of California, San Diego- Ecology, Behavior and Evolution 

M.S. - University of California, San Diego- Biology

bcchiang at ucsc.edu

    

I was born in L.A. and raised in Taiwan. I came back to the U.S. when I was fifteen years old. My interest has always been in the diversity of survival strategies and the evolution of interspecies interaction, so I went for a bachelor’s degree in Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution. I focused my studies and coursework on bioinformatics and biostatistics during my master’s to enrich my understanding and skills for data analysis. My previous work had mostly focused on the evolutionary history of insects. For my undergraduate research, I worked on the phylogeny of Nearctic shield-back katydids in the California Floristic Province and their relationship to the Nedubini katydids worldwide. For my master’s thesis, I utilized high-throughput sequencing of ultraconserved elements to deduce the unique geographic distribution and evolutionary history of California Channel Islands endemic ant species Aphaenogaster patruelis relative to related mainland kin. Currently, I am working on understanding the spatial distribution of bacterial in the human gut microbiome.

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Fatima Rizvi 

Ph.D. Student

B.S. - San Jose State University- Biological Sciences with a concentration in Physiology

fzrizvi at ucsc.edu

I was born and raised in San Diego and then moved to Santa Cruz for my bachelor’s degree at UC Santa Cruz. My undergraduate research focused on Wolbachia, a vertically transmitted bacteria that manipulate its host’s reproductive system via different mechanisms to maximize their spread. One mechanism is called cytoplasmic incompatibility, which is what I focused on. Now I’m studying the interactions between microbes and antibodies in our gut and how different factors influence these antibodies’ production.

I was born and raised in San Diego and then moved to Santa Cruz for my bachelor’s degree at UC Santa Cruz. My undergraduate research focused on Wolbachia, a vertically transmitted bacteria that manipulate its host’s reproductive system via different mechanisms to maximize their spread. One mechanism is called cytoplasmic incompatibility, which is what I focused on. Now I’m studying the interactions between microbes and antibodies in our gut and how different factors influence these antibodies’ production.

I was born and raised in Pakistan and later my family moved to Dubai where I completed middle and high school. Then, I came to California as an international student and completed my bachelors in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Physiology at San Jose State University. In my undergraduate research lab, I studied how bacterial cholesterol dependent cytolysins (aka pore-forming toxins) such as pneumolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae lead to the development of bacteremia in the human host. I found that cholesterol dependent cytolysins compromise lung integrity by destroying intercellular junctions in the lung epithelial monolayer, causing it to have gaps which the bacteria can use to leave the lungs and enter the bloodstream. Now, I am studying how gut bacteria interact with immune cells. 

Giovanni Vega (he/him)

Ph.D. Student

B.S. - University of California, Santa Cruz - Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology 

gvega6 at ucsc.edu

I was born and raised in San Diego and then moved to Santa Cruz for my bachelor’s degree at UC Santa Cruz. My undergraduate research focused on Wolbachia, a vertically transmitted bacteria that manipulate its host’s reproductive system via different mechanisms to maximize their spread. One mechanism is called cytoplasmic incompatibility, which is what I focused on. Now I’m studying the interactions between microbes and antibodies in our gut and how different factors influence these antibodies’ production.

I was born and raised in San Diego and then moved to Santa Cruz for my bachelor’s degree at UC Santa Cruz. My undergraduate research focused on Wolbachia, a vertically transmitted bacteria that manipulate its host’s reproductive system via different mechanisms to maximize their spread. One mechanism is called cytoplasmic incompatibility, which is what I focused on. Now I’m studying the interactions between microbes and antibodies in our gut and how different factors influence these antibodies’ production.

I was born and raised in San Diego and then moved to Santa Cruz for my bachelor’s degree at UC Santa Cruz. My undergraduate research focused on Wolbachia, a vertically transmitted bacteria that manipulate its host’s reproductive system via different mechanisms to maximize their spread. One mechanism is called cytoplasmic incompatibility, which is what I focused on. Now I’m studying the interactions between microbes and antibodies in our gut.

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Alexander Newman (he/him)

Undergraduate

aynewman at ucsc.edu

I was born and raised in San Diego and then moved to Santa Cruz for my bachelor’s degree at UC Santa Cruz. My undergraduate research focused on Wolbachia, a vertically transmitted bacteria that manipulate its host’s reproductive system via different mechanisms to maximize their spread. One mechanism is called cytoplasmic incompatibility, which is what I focused on. Now I’m studying the interactions between microbes and antibodies in our gut and how different factors influence these antibodies’ production.

I was born and raised in San Diego and then moved to Santa Cruz for my bachelor’s degree at UC Santa Cruz. My undergraduate research focused on Wolbachia, a vertically transmitted bacteria that manipulate its host’s reproductive system via different mechanisms to maximize their spread. One mechanism is called cytoplasmic incompatibility, which is what I focused on. Now I’m studying the interactions between microbes and antibodies in our gut and how different factors influence these antibodies’ production.

I am currently a third-year undergraduate studying Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. I am originally from the South Bay Area.  When not at the lab or studying, you’ll find me shredding trails with my mountain biking or gaming at night with my friends. If not, I’m probably traveling internationally to sightsee in other countries.

Ph.D. Rotation Students

2021

2021

2022

Domenique Banta

 

Stephanie Bazarini

Fatima Rizvi

Available Positions

Graduate Students: The lab is accepting current PBSE students for rotations. Prospective graduate students interested in the lab should apply to the PBSE or the METX Doctoral or Masters programs.

Undergraduate Students: We are accepting students seeking research experiences in microbiology, immunology, and biochemistry. Please send your CV, unofficial transcript, and a paragraph describing your scientific interests to PatnodeLab at ucsc.edu.